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Hadrian was perhaps the most significant emperor of Rome. The Adriatic Sea is named after him, and Hadrian's Wall in England was built around CE 122 to divide Roman Britain from the North. The wall was sea-to-sea and was about 117 km long by 3m high and 2.4m wide. He built a similar, but longer, wall in Germany.

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May 29Liked by Kathleen McCook

Thank you !!!! This is ine more treasure, including the video.

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May 29Liked by Kathleen McCook

----During the invasion by the Heruli in 267 century CE, the library suffered notable damage and in 277 CE, when the city sought to better protect itself, the library was made part of a fortification wall. ----

This is fascinating stuff! It was one for all, and all for one, including the library. LOL

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You always add something fascinating and unexpected to my reading list. I didn’t know that I would be interested in this, but you hooked me!

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"Libraries were also a place to hear lectures and orators, and discuss intellectual matters with fellow visitors in the tranquility of the library garden."

The Romans made good use of buildings. That makes a library more than just a collection of books. It's great to hear an expanded purpose.

Any idea on who had access to libraries by Hadrian's time? Only Roman citizens or open to the public?

I found that the official website has a panoramic view of Hadrian's villa that is gives a better sense of scale. English link here: https://www.visittivoli.eu/le-ville/villa-adriana&lang=EN

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